Collective Bias Announces New Metric: Time Spent With Content

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We are very excited to announce a new metric in our suite of measurement features: Time on Content. Since April 2015, we have been tracking content across every category, analyzing over 300,000 hours of content from over 5,000 influencers in our community – and are very excited about what we are seeing.

On average, our long form content is getting 2 minutes, 8 seconds of attention. In December, when audiences are distracted and spending less time online, the average time jumped to 2 minutes, 21 seconds. Compare that to research that shows 55 percent of people typically spend 15 seconds or less on websites and nine seconds with online ads. 

Why is announcing time spent with content such a breakthrough? Why do we think our advertisers are excited?

Advertisers are competing in a world where the attention of the consumer is pulled in many different directions across platforms and devices. Time on Content is a breakthrough because we are able to report the amount of attention that each campaign is receiving individually. When our advertisers run a Collective Bias campaign, they know that the target audience we are reaching is paying attention to the influencer content.

What is the true value of time with respect to content?

The true value of Time on Content is in the ability to measure campaign user engagement beyond pageviews and clicks. As we database each campaign, we begin to notice trends into the type of content that is performing well, and can make data-driven decisions based on that content. While it is important to track clicks and views for an influencer-generated piece of content, we are taking it a step further. When you combine engagement with time spent, you get a truer picture of the value of the content.

Time on Content is in the ability to measure campaign user engagement beyond pageviews and… Click To Tweet

Do you give more weight to time spent or engagement metrics?

When measuring influencer campaigns, it is important to view campaign performance through the entire suite of analytics available. This includes pageviews, social engagements and time spent on content. While social engagements are our most valuable metric because they indicate the actions users take to share content with friends and family, measuring time spent on content is an emerging metric that is already providing great insight into how our influencer campaigns resonate with consumers.

When you look at Time on Content, do you look at it in conjunction with other attributes? If so, what are those attributes and what does it indicate?

Time on Content should be analyzed in context of the tactics utilized for the influencer campaign. There are dynamics that result in different KPIs based on the client’s goals and objectives. One of our strategies is to analyze the difference of time spent on content within the campaign category (CPG, Consumables, Health & Beauty, etc.) in order to provide contextual analysis for our clients. We are only just beginning to understand the value of time.

What is the next big thing to measure in influencer marketing?

With the influx of emerging social media platforms, there are an increasing number of new and innovative ways to measure influencer marketing. The next big thing that many influencer marketing companies, including Collective Bias, are after is the ability to pair explorative metrics with point-of-sale data through data partnerships that quantify the impact of influencer marketing on purchase behavior. Advertisers are eager to answer the profound question, “How does influencer marketing affect the movement of my product off of shelves?”

Have questions?  Want to learn more about Collective Bias’ proprietary dashboard and suite of measurement tools? So excited you want to get a demo? Contact us.



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