Content Marketing World 2015: Day One Reflections

Brad Lawless

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In Cleveland for less that 24 hours for the 2015 Content Marketing World Conference, I’ve already learned the following:
This is a big industry. 
I joined over 3,500 attendees in the massive Cleveland Convention Center for this morning’s keynote. After 6 years at Collective Bias, my daily view of the content marketing world looks a lot like the work we do. In reality, our industry is growing and evolving at a rapid pace.
Marketer, Heal Thyself.

When I checked in to the conference, I received the obligatory bag o’ stuff full of inserts from vendors and conference advertisers. Out of maybe three dozen pieces of collateral, only two got my attention. Most of the collateral promised chances to win things for stopping by booths or communicated flat value propositions for this technology vs its competitor.

The two noteworthy pieces were actual white papers. Their producers did what we should all do when producing content for our customers. They remembered that I’m here to learn and grow and gave me information that will help me do that. Thanks to that information, I kept their bag inserts while everything else ended up in my hotel room trash can.

“Competition commodifies competency…”

according to Jay Baer. Like I said before, I sat in a room with 3,500 other content marketers. Many of them represented technology companies that want to help marketers produce their own content in-house. Many of them were those marketers for B2C or B2B brands looking to engage customers with content, and some of them were influencer marketers like myself. That’s a lot of people working in the same space.

In this increasingly crowded space producing tons of content, how can you differentiate yourself from competitors? Baer advocates for passion as your secret in your content marketing sauce. Commodified industries become boring fast, and boring content will engage no one. You need to find content (and content producers) passionate about their work so that passion will translate to their readers.

 

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