Best Practices for Tumblr

August 31, 2015

Casey Petersen

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Tumblr, for most marketers, is the most intimidating platform. Most brands, in fact, choose to ignore it altogether. While it is more resource-intensive from a content-creation standpoint, the community on Tumblr really rallies around good content, and shares your content more readily than many other social platforms, assuming it’s GOOD content.

While Tumblr has made a move to favor longer-form text content lately, in order to compete with Medium, it’s still primarily a visual platform. Memes, GIFs, and images are fun and easy ways to show your personality as a brand and content producer, and will typically be well-received by the Tumblr audience.

They (Tumblr users) can be advertising-averse. It’s more important on Tumblr than anywhere else to get your personality and voice correct, and be careful with being overly promotional.  Brands that do well on Tumblr, like Denny’s, Marvel, and Calvin Klein, use Tumblr to show off brand and customer experiences that wouldn’t work on the company’s website, and are too long or involved to share in a simple tweet. Your customers love behind-the-scenes glimpses, hearing from company leadership, sneak previews, and similar features. As with other platforms, you can also choose content that is useful for customers. For instance, a mobile phone company may highlight Android apps that make life easier.

Above all, be sure to invest time learning the Tumblr culture. It can be a little more difficult to get involved with, compared to Twitter and Facebook, but will really pay off once you do. However, a word of warning on this point: It will be tempting to jump onto popular memes circulating Tumblr. Do this carefully, ensuring it’s both timely and a good fit for your brand messaging. You don’t want to get your exposure by getting lampooned by the Tumblr community.

Finally, Tumblr can be a good place to host longer-form content, or things that don’t fit in other social posts well. You can easily link to Tumblr from Twitter or other places, when you have a story to tell that doesn’t fit in 140 characters.  

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Social Media Best Practices on Tumblr

Infographic by Grayce Holcomb

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