The Weekly Bias: News Feed Overhauls & Redditors Running Wild

July 22, 2015

Colleen Vaughan

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If you’re tired of reading about Donald Trump’s hair and Amazon’s less-than-prime day, then we’ve got you covered. Let us know what has caught your fancy this week in the comments below.

Facebook’s latest News Feed change lets you pick who you see first

Tired of seeing posts in your News Feed from that random person you haven’t seen in 10 years or that neighbor who constantly posts direct selling links? Facebook has finally heard you. While currently only available in the iOS app, you can now adjust the News Feed features to “prioritize who you see first.” You can select up to 30 Pages and people whose updates will always appear first in your News Feed. Even better, there’s also a feature with a menu for unfollowing friends and Pages you want nothing to do with. Nice move, Facebook.

Facebook Redefines a “Click” to satisfy advertisers

What is a click? Not a like, comment or share on a Facebook ad according to advertisers. Facebook is no longer charging marketers for engagement clicks. The new ad model will only count clicks that spawn a coveted action such as visiting the marketer’s website. While a new model for Facebook, Twitter has been experimenting with direct response ads for nearly a year. However, the challenge of predicting click-through rates still lingers.

Reddit and how NOT to do community

As the self-proclaimed “front page of the Internet”, Reddit has always boasted its protection of free speech. Much of the site is powered by unpaid moderators who oversee the numerous forums, or subreddits, and the massive amount of content these forums house. The kicker is these moderators have no one overlooking their shoulder, meaning they have the power to close off their subreddits if they so choose to. Several subreddit doors were shut to the public after the “questionable” firing of Victoria Taylor, Reddit’s communications director. One of Taylor’s major duties was coordinating the prominent Ask Me Anything, or AMA, posts featuring chats with public figures. Moderators who worked with Taylor said their jobs were made harder by her unannounced sacking. What now, Reddit?

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