Day of the Dead

November 4, 2014
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Written by Adriana Martin

Day of the dead is a legendary tradition from Mexico and it is celebrated on November 2. This tradition started hundreds of years ago when the Aztecs were used to give tribute to the goddess Mictecacihuatl, Queen of Mictlan or Lady of the Dead. The role of this goddess was to watch over the remains.

As years passed the tradition evolved on what we know now as Dia de los Muertos or Day of the Dead. This celebration also coincides with the Catholic celebration of  “All Saints” also called “Día de todos los santos” that is celebrated on November 1 to honor the children that have passed.

In certain countries in Latin America Day of the Dead is also celebrated. For example in Guatemala the celebration is done with kites and fiambre. In Ecuador is embraced by the indigenous Kichwa communities and in Brazil is considered a public holiday.

Here in the United States Day of the Dead has become very popular among the younger segment of bicultural latinos for the Halloween time, therefore an opportunity for brands to tap into in order to offer relevance to an audience that has buying power and that is a growing consumer segment.

Some companies that could take advantage to promote their products during this time of the year are those offering makeup, products for DIY/art-crafts, costumes, fresh flowers, candles, certain food products like chocolate, sugar, flour. drinks including tequila, beer and coffee. As well as Latino products intended for traditional recipe cooking, such as sauces, cheese, avocados and peppers to name a few.

Experts at Ad Age mention that Halloween is a Latino-marketing opportunity since it is the second biggest holiday for consumer spending after Christmas, and characters like La Llorona and the Chupacabra are among the costumes of choice for the holiday.

Younger Latino generations are looking for cultural identity and to represent. Day of the Dead is a great opportunity for that since aligns with authentic cultural values, pride and heritage. While general market audiences are afraid of celebrating death brands and marketers shouldn’t shy of tapping into this holiday if looking for growth and to be relevant to the Hispanic community.

Latinos are loyal to those brands that embrace their culture and traditions.

In cities where Latino concentration is very strong, like California, Texas, New York, Illinois, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, Nevada, New Jersey and Florida it is recommended to develop a marketing strategy to address Dia de los Muertos; this investment could be pivotal for the future of many brands. As hispanic population continues to grow and the buying power to be stronger brands that don’t embrace the Hispanic cultural values and traditions could lose the chance to be among the top brands that Latinos love.

Some examples of what companies are doing regarding Day of the Dead:

Herdez –http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/herdez-brand-celebrates-day-of-the-dead-with-sugar-skull-face-painting–prizes-278269041.html

Day of the Dead Beer –http://www.marketwatch.com/story/hensley-beverage-company-expands-real-mexican-beer-brands-presence-day-of-the-dead-mexicali-in-arizona-2014-04-14

Disney – http://www.buzzfeed.com/juangastelum/send-to-phone-remember-close-backhome-guillermo-del-toro-gus

Adriana Martin is a Latina writer born in Mexico who is specialized in recipe development using fresh and seasonal ingredients. The inspiration behind her recipes is based on the culinary culture of Mexico and influenced by the Mediterranean cuisine and grilling which is one of her passions. Read more on her blog: http://www.adrianasbestrecipes.com

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