Twitter Impressions Were Fraud: Part 1

September 12, 2014
Ian Chan Twitter
Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this page

Written by Spencer Sonaty and Brent Snyder

Twitter Impressions Are Were Fraud: Part 1

Have you ever wondered how many followers you gained from a well performing tweet, or which content improves your engagement rate? Honing the art of using metrics to shape your Twitter strategy should be a constant pursuit. This has been problematic for some time, though, for two main reasons: access to quality social data is very expensive, and measuring impressions as a base for performance has become fraught with pitfalls in recent years.

Twitter now provides accurate metrics to aid in the transparency of how tweets perform, so every Twitter user can gain insights about the content they are posting and the engagement it garners.

In today’s social environment engagement is a topline metric, but engagement is impossible without first generating impressions. Low engagement rates (engagements / impressions) have become the norm, but mainly due to a lack of data surrounding impressions. Impressions have previously been calculated as the number of people who could potentially see a tweet: (total followers x frequency). With the new dashboard on Twitter, impressions are reported as the number of times users were actually served a tweet; a combination of both a user’s followers, and non-followers who also found the tweet via search.

While this clarified view of impressions is monumental, Twitter also breaks out several different types of engagement, including: favorites, detail expands, user profile clicks, replies and retweets. In addition to these metrics, users can see impressions by hour, followers’ locations, gender and popular interests.

Reporting on actual impressions and distinct engagement types will result in more accurate reporting, and better understanding, of engagement rates. This level of insight is vitally important, as users will be able to learn what types of content to use, and when to use it, to better grow followership and engagement overall.

Check out part 2 next week to read how Twitter could be changing the digital ad landscape forever.

Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someonePrint this page