The Weekly Bias: Facebook Seeks to End Fake News

April 8, 2017

Kirsten Thompson

Sr. Content Creator
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Brands focus more on middle-age than Millennials, B2B videos get a facelift, and Facebook tackles the war on fake news, all in this week’s Weekly Bias.

B2B Videos Don’t Have to Be Boring

Most B2B videos show the sign out front, perhaps the factory assembly line or offices, but B2B videos, according to Forbes, don’t have to be this way. Among other things, it is recommended to consider not only your target audience, but the platform on which the video will live, and customize the video for that platform. Above all, make it shareable. For more tips, read the full article on Forbes.

Could Facebook Fact-Checkers End Fake News?

Facebook has received quite a bit of criticism regarding their current system for tackling fake news – by simply relying on users to flag posts. Facebook is now going to pay fact-checkers to monitor news, and they will also work harder to educate users on how to tell the difference between real and fake news stories shared on the social platform. To read more on the new fact-checkers and Facebook’s push to educate users to be more discerning, read the full article on The Drum.

YouTube Withholds Monetization Until Accounts Hit 10K

YouTube announced five years ago that their Partner Program was open to all creators, allowing anyone who signed up for a YouTube account and uploaded a video to start earning money. This apparently brought on a lot of creators essentially posting other people’s content for the sake of views. YouTube changed their rules, announcing that the Partner Program is now only open to creators with 10,000 lifetime views or more, hoping to gain enough information about the creators in that time to make an educated decision on their authenticity. Read more on The Verge.

Brands Looking to Older Generation in Ads

It seems that some brands are looking at new demographics in their advertising, using older models and brand ambassadors to represent their products that have been primarily geared towards younger consumers. Reebok China has an 80-year-old brand ambassador with serious muscle definition, while other brands are looking to the 50 and older age group for creative marketing. “According to Terri Meyer, co-CEO and founder at creative agency Terri & Sandy, the campaign reflects that ’60 is the new 40.'” Read more in this article on AdAge.

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Kirsten Thompson

Sr. Content Creator

Kirsten Thompson has been blogging since 2010, sharing her passion for home decor, organization, and crafts with her ever-growing audience. Her blog has become her business, Sweet Tea LLC. She educates bloggers on the power of email marketing & blog strategy through webinars, digital products and coaching.